Black Visual Artist Chat – Terrance Scott

terrance-scott-the-black-art-fanatic-blog

Terrance is an extraordinary professional visual artist and engineer who is constantly evolving his craft. Like so many teenagers, Terrance’ rebellious spirit often led him into trouble. However, through tremendous determination and his unwavering pursuit of education, Terrance has undergone a complete transformation into a sagacious man. It was an absolute honor to converse with such a remarkable black visual artist. May you gain some necessary encouragement to help you navigate your own creative path.

Me: Describe your upbringing – where you’re originally from, when you started doing art, and your family background.

Terrance: I’m originally from Savannah, Georgia. I moved around with my parents to Florida, and now I’m set here in Ohio. Moving around was huge because when you’re younger you tend to do rebel things. I was in that predicament where I loved art but I also loved trouble. It’s one of those things between the two, which one do you want more? When you’re down South, trouble just speaks to you so you’re constantly in the streets. By me moving to Ohio, it was huge because I didn’t really know anybody. When you’re in trouble you tend to find it but yet I had brothers who kept me in check. My oldest brother was locked up for about 15 years so that was telling me something. I knew I had to do something with my life. You still hang out with the bad crowd, yet I still found my own way. By doing so, I learned things by picking up books, reading; just educating myself and preparing myself to go to college. I knew I wanted to be somebody, I just didn’t want to be that stereotypical black man. Every time you walk in somewhere, we get this persona that we’re just thugs and drug dealers. I just didn’t want to be labeled as that, but yet regardless of whatever we do, we still get labeled as that. We still get treated unfair. But, I still went to college, graduated from a technical college. Got my degree in Applied Science, and also went to Kent State University for project management. I’m still taking classes now so I am constantly trying to evolve.

Me: Excellent! That’s great man definitely keep evolving as a black man, especially. That’s critical to our survival. Like you were saying it’s so many stereotypes and people still don’t see us as this diverse group of people.

Terrance: No, they really don’t. In my type of work, I travel a lot. I’ve been to engineering type businesses where you get all the engineers together. You go to these big banquets to showcase engineers and sell something to them, basically. When you go to these and you look around the majority of the people there are white. When you’re looking like a black-eyed pea compared to a bunch of other beans, it’s weird man. It’s a hurt feeling. I know there’s other engineers out there who are black. But yet, I guess we’re not traveling or doing things to get known or seen. When you don’t see them, you’re like man seriously, I really want to see others that look like me. We have to do more.

“When you’re looking like a black-eyed pea compared to a bunch of other beans, it’s weird man. It’s a hurt feeling.”

Me: Yea, that’s so true, I absolutely agree. Where I work at now, I’m the only black male there and I’ve been the only black male for a minute. So, that definitely hit home for me when you said it hurts, it definitely makes you feel some type of way.

Terrance: Exactly. You’re in that combat zone because you know you’re going to get these stereotypical people from every which angle. Once they have a conversation with you, a lot of other races don’t see you until you actually speak to them. They’re like, “Wow he actually speaks english, he doesn’t actually speak this ebonics.” Now, everybody knows we can get to that point (laughing) where you can connect with your people but on a professional level you still have to be able to speak a certain way. Let’s say If you’re giving some type of speech or you’re doing a conference call, if people know how you look from a picture, they’re not thinking you’re going to speak exact English. They’re just thinking, “Well, it’s another typical black person, I’m just going to wait until they call me”. Then, once they actually meet you and you’re talking to them, they’re looking at you in awe. It kind of feels weird because you’re looking at me because you had this sense that I spoke ‘ghetto.’ I’ve worked in plenty of businesses to where I’ve changed certain people’s mindsets about black people. It’s not something I felt good about because they’re the racists, they’re the ones that are looking at my people and thinking we’re all stupid.

“I’ve worked in plenty of businesses to where I’ve changed certain people’s mindsets about black people. It’s not something I felt good about because they’re the racists, they’re the ones that are looking at my people and thinking we’re all stupid.”

Me: Exactly! At the same time I kind of feel like it’s this whole thing where I’m putting on a show, being reel versus being real. I want to be authentic to who I am too because I love being black, I love my culture and I’m not ashamed of it.

Terrance: No, and me either. You make a great point there because without black people being in existence, you wouldn’t have the cool clothing, you wouldn’t have fashion, you wouldn’t have a lot of things that goes on till this day. Black people as a unit we’re just creative. Whatever we do and put our mind to, we do it at a high level. I love that about us. But, we also have to be more together than separated. I think that’s where we fail because we’re too busy hating each other instead of actually coming together as a group and uplifting each other. You find some people as yourself who try to gather people and make them come together, but it’s such a big gap, it’s a shame. I try to reach out to some of the younger generation and even to the older ones, but some of the older ones are stuck in their mindset so it’s kind of hard to reach them.

Me: That’s really true. I also don’t want to appear to be snobbish either because of the way I talk or the way that I carry myself. I don’t want to appear like I’m looking down on other black people.

Terrance: Right, and this is the exact reason why I don’t post a lot of things about myself on social media. People don’t know what I’ve went through to get to where I am today. In order to get there you have to put in the work. If you don’t put in the work, you’re going to be left with what you’re putting in the work for. Don’t just say, ‘I’m going to do this or I’m going to do that.’  To me you’re just speaking, show it don’t say it. You’re always going to have a roadblock, nothing’s a straight path. You’re always going to have detours, roadblocks, something in the middle of your way. You have to avoid those situations. Something is always going to block you but you have to find another way. Don’t just give up, you just find another route.

“Something is always going to block you but you have to find another way. Don’t just give up, you just find another route”

Me: You’re speaking that knowledge man!

Terrance: It comes with time and age. It’s a lot of experience and a lot of hard work, believe me.

Me: Yea I’m sure, and when did you actually start creating art?

Terrance: Well, when I was probably four at the time, my mom had this big bible and I was so intrigued about Jonah and The Whale story. (laughing) When she read it to me, I was like ‘I want to draw that whale eating somebody!’ (laughing) I drew it in the bible. From that point on I could not stop drawing. Every time I heard a story, I got an image so I had to start drawing or sketching it.

Me: Are there any other artists in your family?

Terrance: My mom was a great artist. I’m pretty sure she still draws till this day. My middle brother draws as well but he does more reality type of drawing. Me, I find it boring because it’s not coming from my imagination. It’s just me seeing something and coming up with an idea. My uncle is also a phenomenal artist. He’s just one of those people man, he had it. That’s a person I would always try to chase. Whatever he did with a pencil and paintbrush, it turned out great. Anything he drew just looked phenomenal. They didn’t do anything with it though. With me as a design engineer, I kind of do it within my profession.

Me: That’s so dope man! I’m more like your brother with the photorealism style as well. It’s funny though because when I was little I was the complete opposite. I would draw from my imagination. I would draw based off of the cartoons that were popular at the time or just looking at the people in my community. I would just draw I wouldn’t necessarily need a picture to get the creative juices flowing. But, somewhere along the way, the imagination wasn’t as expansive as it used to be. That’s what I admire about artists like you though, because you’re just drawing from your imagination. As we get older we tend to lose that.

Terrance: That’s so true. Don’t get me wrong, there’s some poses that I do grab from pictures like if I see a photo and it’s a position I need, I do grab that. Other than that, everything else is coming from the top of my head. But I’m with you, if you don’t use your imagination, then you tend to lose it quickly. My brother is a true example of that, he stopped doing the imagination thing and he prefers to do the photorealism type of images now. I get it and I understand it and it looks dope. But, that’s just not me.

Me: What types of mediums do you use and what do you prefer to use?

Terrance: Pencil, pen, markers, and paper just feel good to me because that’s what I’ve grown to love. Canvas can feel good if I’m doing something huge. Yet, it’s still not the same feeling as pencil, ink pen, and paper. When I get in tune with those I feel good. I like digital to a degree as well, because you can do a lot of stuff. I like to call it ‘the cheater’ because you can do so much stuff with digital that you can’t do with pencil, pads, markers, and paint. It feels like I’m cheating and I don’t feel like I’m enjoying it when I’m doing digital. This is why I stick to markers, pens, and pencils.

“Pencil, pen, markers, and paper just feel good to me because that’s what I’ve grown to love.”

Me: That’s incredible that you can use so many different mediums. That just speaks volumes on the type of artist that you are.

Terrance: I’ve done some stuff for a company I used to work for back in the day and one of the owners found out I was an artist. They wanted me to do this piece for their meeting conference room. Originally, I didn’t feel like doing this, I didn’t feel like painting –  it was going to take too long. Then, I found out my artwork was going to be featured over in Australia and I was thinking, ‘ok, I do want my name over there, so let me do this.’ That ended up being a two week project. I would go to work, come home and literally work until about one in the morning. Then I would go back to work at seven in the morning and come back home and work again. I had to do three pieces that were about four by four feet. One piece was done in all ink. Another one I did was in all watercolor paint. That one took about 6 to 7 hours. It was a tedious project. But yet at the end, the owners of the place (they were in Germany) got a plane ticket and flew out the next day to come out and see me. These people that owned the entire company, coming out just to see me, that was the biggest push in my life. You’re talking about people with big money coming out just to see me, a black man at that. Taking me out to dinner just to get to know me, I worked for that. I enjoyed it and having my work out there in Australia was huge.

Me: That’s incredible man!

Terrance: Thank you! It was one of my first projects out of the states.

Me: Describe how you approach your creative process, what’s your ideal environment to bring out your full range of creativity?

Terrance: To be honest, you can put me in a little corner and I’ll just start creating something. (laughing) I don’t really have to be in a particular place, it can be noisy, it can be silent. Of course, silence is always a great place, but yet I can have noise going on and I would still be able to create something. I used to go to coffee shops just to draw and hear the noise. To me, it was relaxing. So, it doesn’t bother me to be in a quiet room or a loud room. Just give me a pencil and pad and I’ll just start drawing.

“I don’t really have to be in a particular place, it can be noisy, it can be silent. Of course, silence is always a great place, but yet I can have noise going on and I would still be able to create something.”  

Me: I prefer a quieter environment. I’ll listen to music but when it’s a whole bunch of people around I tend to not be as focused.

Terrance: Well, when somebody’s having a conversation with you, yea I agree, but I still can do it somehow. People think I’m not paying attention because I’m so in tune to what I’m doing. But no, I’m hearing your conversation just as clear. Actually, while we’re on the phone I’m still drawing. (laughing)

Me: (laughing) That’s so dope man, much respect!

Terrance: It’s something I learned when I was younger. I just enjoy it, it’s who I am. I will say that music does bring out another side of you. You get the jamming in your tunes and it takes you to another realm. Yea, music definitely helps.

Me: That’s great man, like I said before much respect! You get it in wherever! (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing) Pretty much, that’s how I am. If I’m at a restaurant, I’ll take out my post-its (I carry these wherever I go) still have a conversation, and draw while people are around. Yet, you tend to attract a crowd when you do that because people are looking at what you’re creating. It’s kind of amazing because you can start a conversation with anybody on art. It goes into such a conversation piece to where this person gives you their business card or they want to buy something from you.

“It’s kind of amazing because you can start a conversation with anybody on art.”

Me: Yea that’s so true. It definitely unifies everybody. They come together over art.

Terrance: Exactly. Race isn’t a big issue at that time. If people can apply that to life and just enjoy each other. Yes you’re going to have some disagreements. It’s like work, you’re always going to have that struggle where one person doesn’t think like the other. Yet, if you guys can meet at a median, then it works. If you guys can’t meet in the middle and bring your ideas together, then you shouldn’t be working together. You should have your own company because you want to go in a different direction.

Me: Wow, yea I’m going to let that thought linger for a little bit.

Terrance: (laughing) It’s alright, it’s how I think. It’s the same way with art. Sometimes you can get a pointer from another artist. It’s not saying that this artist is degrading you or anything but sometimes it’s from their standpoint. We as artists don’t see everything. Then again, it’s for that artist to also respect that artist’s idea because it’s from their perspective too. I had an incident where some artist said, “oh women’s breasts do not work like that.” I get what that artist was saying but I’m not drawing to their anatomy. I know how to draw a woman’s breasts just as well as the next man, I’m just drawing them to my style, how I see fit. Let’s face it, nobody wants to see sloppy breasts in a piece. I don’t. I’m not particularly fond of seeing that. It’s not what you’re going to see in pinup art. You want to see art that’s fantasized, it’s called a fantasy for a reason.

Me: Exactly. And if you look at the work of other artists such as Michelangelo for example, they drew the idealized person within their culture.

Terrance: Exactly. It was never a person that was dope, sloppy. I’m not saying that these people aren’t important. Yea, they’re important. Could I draw more of them? I could but I’ll do it when I feel like doing it. To me, it’s not a fantasy. I’m showing you a fantasy world, I’m not showing you reality. You have artists out there who do reality work.

Terrance: Another thing I told this artist, who happened to be a reality artist that draws these women with these breasts, ‘ok you know that there is no perfect breast.’ One’s always going to be bigger than the other. I think it hit home base for him and he retracted his statement towards me. It’s always those wars that people don’t pay attention to. But it constantly goes on between artists. I call it the artists that bully those that don’t have the numbers on social media.

Me: That’s very interesting, it relates to how the gatekeepers of the art world think that everything that they say is applicable to every artist. What we really crave is the diversity.

Terrance: Exactly.

Me: That’s what attracts me to your work, the fact that you’re not creating something that meets a standard.

Terrance: No, that’s the thing, I don’t want to be in those labels where a lot of artists are. Can I do any and everything? Yea I can. I’m not in competition with anybody, I’m only in competition with myself. I know what I need to do to become what I need to become. What you’re doing is for you and what I’m doing is for me. A lot of artists won’t admit this, but that’s why I don’t like to do too many commissions because it sidetracks you. If you’re working on a comic or achieving a goal, commissions kind of keep you from where you’re trying to go because you’re doing something for somebody else. The only reason why I do commissions is because it’s big money and it’s big exposure. I’ve gotten pieces over in Slovakia as well as Germany. These are things I don’t really post or announce. I do it because I want to see my brand across the world. It’s great when people come to you from overseas and they want your work. They’re so happy when they take it back because they respect YOUR art.

“I’m not in competition with anybody, I’m only in competition with myself. I know what I need to do to become what I need to become. What you’re doing is for you and what I’m doing is for me.”

Me: Wow, that’s really cool man!

Terrance: Yea, it feels good. I have respect for when people are working hard like yourself. You’re trying to do things for other people, you’re not just doing it for yourself.

Me: Thank you so much man. I really appreciate that. It’s difficult though when you’re in the beginning stages and you don’t see the fruits of your labor yet.

Terrance: It will come. Just be ready for the rush. When it comes man it comes in numbers. I’ve said this plenty of times. It catches me off guard at times because when I get a certain email or call from businesses who say, “I like your work, can we do something.” And I would say, ‘damn I wasn’t ready for this yet’ but I’m going to do it. So, be prepared for it.

Me: I’m not just doing this for the recognition either but you’re human and you want to get some recognition just to show that your work is dope! (laughing)

Terrance: Exactly. You’re material man, it’s on point! It’s on par with some of the top magazines. When I read a couple of the artists, I was like ‘damn this is well worded.’ I read a lot and people tend to not read a lot of material. It’s in-depth, well-read, and it just flows.

Me: Wow. Thank you man, I really appreciate that! It means a lot!

Terrance: No problem. For a black man as yourself, to put it together you’re already scrutinized because you’re black. Like I tell people on my IG page I don’t just do art, I do read art to stay in tune or to know something. If you do not read I think you’re at a loss. It’s good to know where certain things are placed, like the anatomy. You have to read certain material in order to know where it’s going. With your site, it’s giving you a story but yet it’s putting the reader in your shoes of how you’re asking the questions.

Me: Thank you so much! I can’t thank you enough! I’ll pay you later! (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing) It’s no problem!

Me: If you could collaborate with any artist on an upcoming piece who would it be and why?

Terrance: To be honest, I’ll probably collaborate with anybody. I’m not this person to say who’s my favorite. I really don’t have a super favorite. It’s a learning process for me and them. You get to know what they like to do and where they want to go with their project.

“I really don’t have a super favorite. It’s a learning process for me and them. You get to know what they like to do and where they want to go with their project!”

Me: Great answer!

Terrance: Thank you!

Me: What’s your favorite piece you created?

Terrance: I don’t think I’ve done it yet, to be honest. For any artist, somebody’s going to name something for that time and that moment. But yet, that could change tomorrow. For me, I’m a person that strives to create something that’s better than the last drawing. So, if you can do that every time you step up to the plate and draw something, you’re on your way. I haven’t done a piece that’s my favorite, yet. I think I’ll get there eventually, but for right now, I don’t have one.

Me: Wow, these answers man!

Terrance: (laughing) I’m always one to think outside the box. I can always come to agreeing on an idea or concept but I’m never thinking the same way as someone else. We might be on the same path, but I might have something different. That’s the way I like it. You’re going to have different ideas.

Me: Drop the mic! (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing) I’m not really a big talker but if you ask me questions, I get in tune. It starts to flow.

Me: Me either, I’m an introvert straight up. Most of my energy I get comes from within me. I think that’s a major thing that made me gravitate towards art. It’s just a way for you to satisfy your whole being.

Terrance: I agree with that 100 percent. It’s an escape for me, if I’m having a tough time with something. Not too long ago, my stepmom had passed and I went through a slump. It was just so hard to get out of, I was lost at that point in time. I was trying to do art but nothing I was doing on the paper was just looking right to me. For about a couple months, I could not do anything I liked.

“Not too long ago, my stepmom had passed and I went through a slump. It was just so hard to get out of, I was lost at that point in time. I was trying to do art but nothing I was doing on the paper was just looking right to me.”

Me:  What would you say helped you to get back to creating? One of my other questions was, ‘name a time when you experienced a creative block and how did you overcome it?’ I guess that time period was one when you had a creative block.

Terrance:  Yea, it was probably one of the biggest creative blocks I’ve had. Ever. Two months is a long time for me. This is going to sound kind of generic but just seeing some of my IG followers putting up work and seeing how they were applying themselves helped me get through it. If I wasn’t looking at their work, then I probably would’ve been in a slump for three or four months.

“…just seeing some of my IG followers putting up work and seeing how they were applying themselves helped me get through it.”

Me: That’s the great thing about these different social media platforms as well. They really help you form a community of like-minded people where you have so many great artists in one place that you can connect with, bounce ideas off of, and just get inspired.

Terrance: Exactly. It was some of the younger fans and some of the older ones who were fans of my work. They were constantly saying “this is great stuff, your work is unbelievable, I’m a big fan. If you ever do any comics you have my support.” Hearing things like that means a lot. I’m appreciative of what they’re telling me.

Me: That’s great man. We definitely have to keep creating these spaces for people to be able to communicate, especially within our culture.

Terrance: Exactly. Not too long ago a follower actually DM’d me. It was his father telling me, ‘you’re such an inspiration to my son, you’re doing great work and I really respect what you’re doing.’ That really hit home. That’s huge and it’s unbelievable when you get parents to see their kid watching somebody doing something positive and getting them motivated to do their artwork. It feels great.

Me: That’s an excellent story! I know as an artist you just feel like, ‘wow, I’m actually creating an impact on other people’s lives.’ That’s what you want your artwork to do.

Terrance: Man, I never thought I would impact people’s lives to this degree. Sometimes I have to take a step back and think, ‘what else can I do to keep this going?’ But, you have to realize you just have to be yourself. You don’t have to do anything extra. Keep doing what you’re doing.

“…I never thought I would impact people’s lives to this degree. Sometimes I have to take a step back and think, ‘what else can I do to keep this going?’”

Me: That’s so cool, I really like that man! The one thing that attracted me to your work as well was the different types of hero-like characters. A lot of them that you draw are people of African descent. They’re at the forefront.

Terrance: What I’m trying to do with these heroes is show the strength of black people. We are a strong people. People love what we do. I’m trying to let everybody know that we’re not a weak race at all. Even though, we get degraded all the time. No other people get as much flack as black people. I was talking to a friend of mine and I was saying, ‘when you look at a good character what color do they wear?’ “White,” he said. Then I asked, ‘when you see a bad character what color do they wear?’ “Black,” he said. Then I said, ‘okay, when you look at the human race, who’s depicted as the bad guy?’ He just paused. Yet, It’s true, we’re always looked at as these evil people. However, we’re just people who are trying to get on that same platform as everyone else.

“What I’m trying to do with these heroes is show the strength of black people. We are a strong people. People love what we do.”

Me: Yea, I completely agree. Can you actually give us some more background on some of the black heros that you create, particularly your original character Blink? He looks a lot like you so I’m assuming he’s based off of you? (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing) Yea, he’s me. The reason why he’s called Blink is because, ‘what’s faster than a blink?’ With his electricity power, his speed is unimaginable. He can be anywhere in a blink. That’s where the name came from. Plus, I wanted something to standout. If you look at a hero like Superman or Batman, you always know what they can do and their weakness. Yet, when you come up with a hero like Blink who doesn’t really have a weakness, what can you do? This guy is intelligent, he has a cool head, but yet he can go into a rage. It’s those type of heroes that I’m trying to create. There’s other heroes in his world that are based on people who I know. They’re people I’ve grown friendships with. Even some friends I’ve made on Instagram, I’ve thrown into the book. They always ask, “am I going to die in the book?” (laughing) I never tell them! I’m a big fan of people and personalities. I can make a hero from that person and I can get a power just because that person said something or their personality puts me into that realm. It’s those things that trigger a superhero or villain for me.

Me: I love it! (laughing)

Terrance: Yea, Blink is me. He’s pigeon-toed like me as people can see in my pictures on IG. I was also very active in sports. I still love sports till this day. It will be some implementation of that in the book. There’s other people in the series though. I’m just getting this guy out there to the front because he’s the main star of the book itself. The other hero everybody says I look like is Roach. That’s the blue guy. Basically, what I’m doing with that character is showing my meanside. Blink would be who I am today. Roach would be this person of old. I try to give you different sides of me, but yet in a book.

“Blink would be who I am today. Roach would be this person of old. I try to give you different sides of me, but yet in a book.”

Me: Wow, that is too cool man. That imagination right there, that’s dope!

Terrance: Thank you, appreciate that. Don’t be surprised if you get thrown in a book. Anybody who I get a vibe from, usually it works into the book. There’s two different books I’m working on now, and that’s Blood Lineage and MERCS. They’re based in a whole different universe. Space is so vast. You don’t know what’s really out there. That’s why I tend to use a lot of space stuff in my art just because you don’t know. I can take that and run with it.

Me: Those are some incredible concepts that you use in your series. Much respect!

Terrance: Thank you, I really appreciate that.

Me: I really like the way you portray your characters, especially the black characters with the fashions like those sneakers.

Terrance: Thank you. I’m really trying to give people that image of what black people are. We bring a lot to the table and that’s what I’m trying to put in my characters. They got the fashion going, they’re looking super and tough.

Me: I really applaud you for that and portraying a diverse range of black people. We’re not all the same, it’s a very vast culture.

Terrance: It is and I want people to see more in-depth of what we do and how much of the world we impact. I don’t think a lot of other groups see how much impact we bring upon products, and fashion in general. We impact that a bunch. No matter how people look at it, we impact fashion the best. Anything that’s going on hip, we bring to the forefront. Even if it’s not hip, we make it hip. Because it’s something about us – people hate us but people love us. No matter how much they want to kill us, at the end game they need US.

“No matter how people look at it, we impact fashion the best. Anything that’s going on hip, we bring to the forefront. Even if it’s not hip, we make it hip. Because it’s something about us – people hate us but people love us.”

Me: It’s crazy about that dichotomy, it’s a love/hate relationship.

Terrance: Exactly. Without us there wouldn’t be a culture.

Me: What was the most challenging piece you’ve done?

Terrance: I really don’t think I’ve come across that challenge yet. I’m not an arrogant artist, but I know what I can do. I feel like I can do anything if I put my mind to it.

Me: What is your most proud achievement so far as an artist?

Terrance: I really haven’t come across that moment yet either. I have another story for you, though. When I was 21, I had an offer to do a comic for a certain large company. I had to draw like a certain person though so I didn’t take it. I didn’t want to do it just because I would be doing something that I was not going to enjoy. The company was huge. Everybody to this day is probably still trying to get into this company. People always say, “aww man, you’re stupid, why would you not take that position?” To draw like someone else, why would you go through the pain, the agony, the hours, the time, the hard work trying to create your own identity to draw like someone else. I wanted to be like Todd Mcfarlane who is one of my favorite comic book artists. He had the freedom to do any creative thing he wanted to do with the characters. I’m my own man, I want to be me.

Me: Wow. That just shows the type of person you are, just being able to have the courage to turn down such a role where someone else would be like, “I’m going for that one, I’ll create whatever you want me to create.”

Terrance: When it comes to my craft, I want to be my creative self. I don’t want to be like somebody else. I want to think like Terrance Scott. Do I regret it? Not one bit. Even if they offered the role to me today, I still wouldn’t do it.

“When it comes to my craft, I want to be my creative self. I don’t want to be like somebody else.”

Me: I definitely give you mad respect for that one. So many people out here would jump on that type of opportunity and put all their morals and values aside.

Terrance: I know it wasn’t the right move for me. I would’ve been miserable because I would be doing something that’s not really me.

Me: Man, you better go on with that ministry bruh! (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing) Hopefully it helps somebody else down the road.

Me: Definitely

Terrance: I’m always humble, I’m not this person that gets this huge head because I’ve worked for a certain company. I’m grateful for people who like my work or gets inspiration from what I’m doing. That gives me joy and motivates me to do more of it.

“I’m grateful for people who like my work or gets inspiration from what I’m doing. That gives me joy and motivates me to do more of it.”

Me: That’s excellent! That’s a lot of wisdom right there!

Terrance: Some people give up a lot, they give up their talent, or a goal they set to become this omega star of the artist realm. No, I choose not to do that. I’m not going to give up my morals just to receive something that I’m not going to be satisfied with.

Me: Yea. At the end of the day that’s what it’s about, are you going to be happy with those decisions that you make?  

Terrance: Exactly. I’ve made a couple of choices in my life and that one to me wasn’t a mistake. It was something I believed in. When I’ve had scholarships for sports and I didn’t take them, those were mistakes. I was blinded by what I was doing in the streets. But, I learned a lesson.

Me: That’s true. You also have to account for the fact that you’re human too. Of course you’re going to fall and make certain decisions that you may feel, “that was dumb, I shouldn’t have done that.”

Terrance: Right. Exactly.

Me: I’m telling you Terrance, these conversations get me going too. It’s therapy for me as well. Let me try to get my mind back together because you’re dropping all these gems over here! (laughing)

Terrance: (laughing)

Me: How has your artwork shaped you as a person?

Terrance: You probably know this because you’re on the art side as well. They always say that the artist has a different side to them. It’s like we have a different brain then other people and I can kind of relate to that. We are on a different spectrum. We might see something that somebody else doesn’t see just because we have that creative side. When you’re on the engineering side, and you have an artistic side, people will look at you weird. It baffles them at times. To me, it feels good because I’m seeing something that they didn’t see. Sometimes another artist in the room can see something I didn’t see as well. To me it’s mind blowing, but it also puts you in another world and it brings out that humility in you as well. We live to do things and we live to see things.

“We are on a different spectrum. We might see something that somebody else doesn’t see just because we have that creative side.”

Me: Wow, you know that’s going to go on my IG right? (laughing) Well, a lot of your quotes are going on my Instagram!

Terrance: (laughing) Glad I could help.

Me: In your opinion, what do you think young black visual artists can do to create more opportunities for themselves?

Terrance: I would say just keep practicing. Communicating with other artists is huge in this world of social media. You get to meet some big name artists and every now and then someone will give you a shout out. The only way you’re going to get yourself out there is if you keep posting your work. Stay consistent.

Me: Nice! What’s your vision for the future in terms of your artistry?

Terrance: I want to start my own business. You never really know what you’re going to get into, but it’s still going to revolve around doing art.

Me: Cool. It was such a pleasure being able to have this conversation with you Terrance, I really appreciate it!

Terrance: No problem! I really appreciate what you’re doing with these artists! Continue to keep pushing! It’s definitely a positive light!

To connect with Terrance and inquire about his work, contact him via email: teescott02@gmail.com or his Instagram @teescott13.

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